Connect to Disconnect


The Douglas County Sheriff’s Office will be participating in the Connect to Disconnect event from April 6-13, 2020. April 9th will be the main day for this event. Funding for this event is provided by ODOT. 

DISTRACTED DRIVING IN OREGON 
 
“Distracted Driving” is a dangerous behavior for drivers, passengers, and non-occupants alike. Distraction is a specific type of inattention that occurs when drivers divert their attention from the driving task to focus on some other activity instead (per NHTSA). 

From 2013-2017 There were 12,031 fatal and injury crashes resulting in 95 fatalities and 11,946 injuries caused by crashes involving a distracted driver in Oregon (all ages).

2013-2017 There were 1,089 fatal and injury crashes involving a driver (all ages) reported to have been using a cell phone at the time of the crash: 20 fatalities and 1,557 people injured.

2013-2017 There were 112 fatal and injury crashes involving a driver age 16-18 reported to have been using a cell phone at the time of the crash: 0 fatalities and 158 people injured.

2013-2017 There were 72,032 convictions for this offense. 

Convictions for using a mobile electronic device 2013-2017
2013 -   21,520
2014 -   17,723
2015 -   15,264
2016 -   10,317
2017 -     7,208
Total –  72,032

2013-2017 There were 32 crashes involving, but not limited to a Pedestrian, using a cell phone: 2 fatalities and 30 injuries.

2013-2017 There were 10 crashes involving, but not limited to a Pedal-cyclist, using a cell phone: 0 fatalities and 10 people injured.

2013-2017 There were 224 work zone distracted driving crashes: 4 fatalities and 381 people injured. 

WHAT IS DISTRACTED DRIVING?

Distraction occurs when a driver voluntarily diverts attention to something not related to driving that uses the driver's eyes, ears, or hands. There are four types of driver distraction:

Visual -- looking at something other than the road
Auditory -- hearing something not related to driving
Manual -- manipulating something other than the wheel
Cognitive -- thinking about something other than driving

Most distractions involve more than one of these types, with both a sensory -- eyes, ears, or touch -- and a mental component.

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